Guiding Your Teenager Through Friendships.

Author: Dan Keating/29 March 2018/Categories: School Support

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“Telling a teenager the facts of life is like giving a fish a bath.”

Arnold H. Glasow

 

There exists a lot of pressure for your teen to listen to their friends


There exist huge amounts of social pressure on teens today and the opinions of their friends become extremely important. But they still need help and support to build and maintain healthy friendships. I cannot stress the importance of developing a good parent-teen relationship, staying connected and especially paying attention to them. Continuing to be a role model, the person they look up to a reliable parent. I am not suggesting becoming their friend just remaining their parent.

 

Support Group

Friendships are a necessary support group for teenagers. They provide a sense belonging and a feeling of value which in turn assists in building confidence. Teens will not always ask parents for information as in some cases they may find it all too embarrassing, for example, puberty and what they are experiencing physically and emotionally. Friendships are a good source of information and provide emotional support with a sense of security and comfort with others going through the same experiences. For many teens, the teen years is where they develop relationships with the opposite sex and romantic and sexual relationships are experienced.

 

As the transition from child to teen begins it is very normal for teenagers to spend more time alone and with their friends. Essentially this translates to them spending less time with family. Many parents fret about this and fear these intense friendships will become more valuable than the family unit. This is not unusual and if you cast your memory back and are honest with yourself your behaviour was the same.

 

Fear not your child, now a teen, still needs you and as they get older and mature you may even need them and who knows they may offer you support. As parents, it is important to encourage friendship among teens, but it is also very important to know who your teen is friends with and have open conversations about the different relationships with your teen. Encourage your son or daughter to be a good friend there are a few ways that this can be done and the lifelong benefit is that it will stand to your child for future years in how they develop relationships.

 

Friendships are not forever

Sometimes young people do not realise that all friendships are not forever. People change over their lifetime and friends that your child is close to now, might not be the friendships they have in years to come. The occasional fallout between friends is natural. Help them navigate through conflict. Show respect to others and they should be respectful to you!

 

"As a parent, there is nothing worse than making the tough decisions"

As a parent, there is nothing worse than making the tough decisions and suddenly becoming the “bad person”. Perhaps being told how much they hate you and how you are ruining their life and followed off by the slamming of doors and then to top it off, a picture without sound. It is not our job to be our child’s friend. Our job is far more complicated than that. Children and especially adolescents need limits they crave boundaries and structure. And as teenagers, they most definitely need a healthy separation from their parents. Our job is to teach our children and when and they will disobey dish out consequences. If you become their friend it is impossible to lay down the law and be respected by your teen. If you have treated your teen as a friend you will create confusion and they will believe that their power is equal to yours.

 

As our children grow up they strive to learn where they fit in and what is their place in the world, it is our job to guide and give them the time and space to grow into each phase developing to the next stage. Treating them as a peer/friend will not allow them to be kids.

 

“I tell my child, if I seem obsessed to always know where you've been, it is because my DNA will be found at the scene.”

Robert Brault

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